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Güncel sürümün sahibi: Andrew W. ,

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Usually in laptops, they won't have a little socket for the CMOS battery like a normal desktop motherboard would. Instead they tend to have them plug into the board using a little cable and then stick it to the case somewhere with some glue. [http://www.allabouthappylife.com/acer_ferrari_5000/acer_ferrari_5000_detach-rtc-battery.jpg|It'll look like a little round guy wrapped in black tape with 2 small wires coming out that plug in somewhere on the motherboard.]
 
Sometimes they can be soldered on as well; which definitely messes up your plans. Its equally possible it does have a little socket similar to a desktop in which case, depending on its location, you might have to take out the entire motherboard to access it. Its hard to say exactly what you'd have to do.
 
On some models you can just take off one of the bottom covers and it will be right there, on others you have to go pretty deep into the system to find it.
 
Luckily HP has really amazing documentation for their stuff, so here's the maintenance and service manual that can show you how to disassemble the laptop: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01905586.pdf
 
HP usually refers to the CMOS battery as an RTC Battery (Real Time Clock) in their documentation. You can search the document for that and it'll show you just how to do it. (Extra Pro Tip: Check page 97 :P)
HP usually refers to the CMOS battery as an RTC Battery (Real Time Clock) in their documentation. You can search the document for that and it'll show you just how to do it. (Extra Pro Tip: Check page 97 :P)

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Andrew W. ,

Metin:

Usually in laptops, they won't have a little socket for the CMOS battery like a normal desktop motherboard would. Instead they tend to have them plug into the board using a little cable and then stick it to the case somewhere with some glue. [http://www.allabouthappylife.com/acer_ferrari_5000/acer_ferrari_5000_detach-rtc-battery.jpg|It'll look like a little round guy wrapped in black tape with 2 small wires coming out that plug in somewhere on the motherboard.]
 
On some models of laptop you can just take off one of the bottom covers and it willSometimes they can be right there,soldered on othersas well; which definitely messes up your plans. Its equally possible it does have a little socket similar to a desktop in which case, depending on its location, you might have to go pretty deep into the systemtake out the entire motherboard to findaccess it. Its hard to say exactly what you'd have to do.
On some models of laptop you can just take off one of the bottom covers and it willSometimes they can be right there,soldered on othersas well; which definitely messes up your plans. Its equally possible it does have a little socket similar to a desktop in which case, depending on its location, you might have to go pretty deep into the systemtake out the entire motherboard to findaccess it. Its hard to say exactly what you'd have to do.
 
Sometimes they canOn some models you can just take off one of the bottom covers and it will be solderedright there, on as well; which definitely messes up your plans. Its equally possible it does have a little socket similar to a desktop in which case, depending on its location,others you might have to take out the entire motherboardgo pretty deep into the system to accessfind it. Its hard to say exactly what you'd have to do.
Sometimes they canOn some models you can just take off one of the bottom covers and it will be solderedright there, on as well; which definitely messes up your plans. Its equally possible it does have a little socket similar to a desktop in which case, depending on its location,others you might have to take out the entire motherboardgo pretty deep into the system to accessfind it. Its hard to say exactly what you'd have to do.
 
Luckily HP has really amazing documentation for their stuff, so here's the maintenance and service manual that can show you how to disassemble the laptop: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01905586.pdf
 
HP usually refers to the CMOS battery as an RTC Battery (Real Time Clock) in their documentation. You can search the document for that and it'll show you just how to do it.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Andrew W. ,

Metin:

Usually in laptops, they won't have a little socket for the CMOS battery like a normal desktop motherboard would. Instead they tend to have them plug into the board using a little cable and then stick it to the case somewhere with some glue. [http://www.allabouthappylife.com/acer_ferrari_5000/acer_ferrari_5000_detach-rtc-battery.jpg|It'll look like a little round guy wrapped in black tape with 2 small wires coming out that plug in somewhere on the motherboard.]
 
On some models of laptop you can just take off one of the bottom covers and it will be right there, on others you have to go pretty deep into the system to find it.
 
Sometimes they can be soldered on as well; which definitely messes up your plans. Its equally possible it does have a little socket similar to a desktop in which case, depending on its location, you might have to take out the entire motherboard to access it. Its hard to say exactly what you'd have to do.
Sometimes they can be soldered on as well; which definitely messes up your plans. Its equally possible it does have a little socket similar to a desktop in which case, depending on its location, you might have to take out the entire motherboard to access it. Its hard to say exactly what you'd have to do.
 
My recommendation is to just start taking it apart and see what find. Its hard to know for every model of laptop exactly where the CMOS battery is.

Luckily
Luckily HP has really amazing documentation for their stuff, so here's the maintenance and service manual that can show you how to disassemble the laptop: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01905586.pdf
My recommendation is to just start taking it apart and see what find. Its hard to know for every model of laptop exactly where the CMOS battery is.

Luckily
Luckily HP has really amazing documentation for their stuff, so here's the maintenance and service manual that can show you how to disassemble the laptop: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01905586.pdf
 
HP usually refers to the CMOS battery as an RTC Battery (Real Time Clock) in their documentation. You can search the document for that and it'll show you just how to do it.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Andrew W. ,

Metin:

Usually in laptops, they won't have a little socket for the CMOS battery like a normal desktop motherboard would. Instead they tend to have them plug into the board using a little cable and then stick it to the case somewhere with some glue. [http://www.allabouthappylife.com/acer_ferrari_5000/acer_ferrari_5000_detach-rtc-battery.jpg|It'll look like a little round guy wrapped in black tape with 2 small wires coming out that plug in somewhere on the motherboard.]
 
On some models of laptop you can just take off one of the bottom covers and it will be right there, on others you have to go pretty deep into the system to find it.
 
Sometimes they can be soldered on as well; which definitely messes up your plans. Its equally possible it does have a little socket similar to a desktop in which case, depending on its location, you might have to take out the entire motherboard to access it.
 
My recommendation is to just start taking it apart and see what find. Its hard to know for every model of laptop exactly where the CMOS battery is.
 
Luckily HP has really amazing documentation for their stuff, so here's the maintenance and service manual that can helpshow you locatehow to disassemble the laptop: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01905586.pdf

HP usually refers to
the CMOS battery as an RTC Battery (Real Time Clock) in their documentation. You can search the document for that and it'll show you just how to disassemble the laptop: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01905586.pdfdo it.
Luckily HP has really amazing documentation for their stuff, so here's the maintenance and service manual that can helpshow you locatehow to disassemble the laptop: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01905586.pdf

HP usually refers to
the CMOS battery as an RTC Battery (Real Time Clock) in their documentation. You can search the document for that and it'll show you just how to disassemble the laptop: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01905586.pdfdo it.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Andrew W. ,

Metin:

Usually in laptops, they won't have a little socket for the CMOS battery like a normal desktop motherboard would. Instead they tend to have them plug into the board using a little cable and then stick it to the case somewhere with some glue. [http://www.allabouthappylife.com/acer_ferrari_5000/acer_ferrari_5000_detach-rtc-battery.jpg|It'll look like a little round guy wrapped in black tape with 2 small wires coming out that plug in somewhere on the motherboard.]
 
On some models of laptop you can just take off one of the bottom covers and it will be right there, on others you have to go pretty deep into the system to find it.
 
Sometimes they can be soldered on as well; which definitely messes up your plans. Its equally possible it does have a little socket similar to a desktop in which case, depending on its location, you might have to take out the entire motherboard to access it.
 
My recommendation is to just start taking it apart and see what find. Its hard to know for every model of laptop exactly where the CMOS battery is.
My recommendation is to just start taking it apart and see what find. Its hard to know for every model of laptop exactly where the CMOS battery is.
 
Luckily HP has really amazing documentation for their stuff, so hereshere's the maintenance manual that can help you locate the CMOS battery and show you how to disassemble the laptop: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01905586.pdf
Luckily HP has really amazing documentation for their stuff, so hereshere's the maintenance manual that can help you locate the CMOS battery and show you how to disassemble the laptop: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01905586.pdf

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Andrew W. ,

Metin:

Usually in laptops, they won't have a little socket for the CMOS battery like a normal desktop motherboard would. Instead they tend to have them plug into the board using a little cable and then stick it to the case somewhere with some glue. [http://www.allabouthappylife.com/acer_ferrari_5000/acer_ferrari_5000_detach-rtc-battery.jpg|It'll look like a little round guy wrapped in black tape with 2 small wires coming out that plug in somewhere on the motherboard.]
 
On some models of laptop you can just take off one of the bottom covers and it will be right there, on others you have to go pretty deep into the system to find it.
 
Sometimes they can be soldered on as well; which definitely messes up your plans. Its equally possible it does have a little socket similar to a desktop in which case, depending on its location, you might have to take out the entire motherboard to access it.
 
My recommendation is to just start taking it apart and see what find. Its hard to know for every model of laptop exactly where the CMOS battery is. Luckily

Luckily
HP has really amazing documentation for their stuff, so heres the maintenance manual that can help you locate the CMOS battery and show you how to disassemble the laptop: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01905586.pdf
My recommendation is to just start taking it apart and see what find. Its hard to know for every model of laptop exactly where the CMOS battery is. Luckily

Luckily
HP has really amazing documentation for their stuff, so heres the maintenance manual that can help you locate the CMOS battery and show you how to disassemble the laptop: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01905586.pdf

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Andrew W. ,

Metin:

Usually in laptops, they won't have a little socket for the CMOS battery like a normal desktop motherboard would. Instead they tend to have them plug into the board using a little cable and then stick it to the case somewhere with some glue. [http://www.allabouthappylife.com/acer_ferrari_5000/acer_ferrari_5000_detach-rtc-battery.jpg|It'll look like a little round guy wrapped in black tape with 2 small wires coming out that plug in somewhere on the motherboard.]
 
On some models of laptop you can just take off one of the bottom covers and it will be right there, on others you have to go pretty deep into the system to find it.
 
Sometimes they can be soldered on as well; which definitely messes up your plans. Its equally possible it does have a little socket similar to a desktop in which case, depending on its location, you might have to take out the entire motherboard to access it.
 
My recommendation is to just start taking it apart and see what find. Its hard to know for every model of laptop exactly where the CMOS battery is. Luckily HP has really amazing documentation for their stuff, so heres the maintenance manual that can help you locate the CMOS battery and show you how to disassemble the laptop: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01905586.pdf
My recommendation is to just start taking it apart and see what find. Its hard to know for every model of laptop exactly where the CMOS battery is. Luckily HP has really amazing documentation for their stuff, so heres the maintenance manual that can help you locate the CMOS battery and show you how to disassemble the laptop: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01905586.pdf

Durum:

open

Orijinal gönderinin sahibi: Andrew W. ,

Metin:

Usually in laptops, they won't have a little socket for the CMOS battery like a normal desktop motherboard would. Instead they tend to have them plug into the board using a little cable and then stick it to the case somewhere with some glue.  [http://www.allabouthappylife.com/acer_ferrari_5000/acer_ferrari_5000_detach-rtc-battery.jpg|It'll look like a little round guy wrapped in black tape with 2 small wires coming out that plug in somewhere on the motherboard.]

On some models of laptop you can just take off one of the bottom covers and it will be right there, on others you have to go pretty deep into  the system to find it.

Sometimes they can be soldered on as well; which definitely messes up your plans. Its equally possible it does have a little socket similar to a desktop in which case, depending on its location, you might have to take out the entire motherboard to access it.

My recommendation is to just start taking it apart and see what find. Its hard to know for every model of laptop exactly where the CMOS battery is.

Durum:

open