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All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but Epson is the most aboutaggressive in terms of stopping the printer when the counter is maxed out. This is made worse since they waste more ink then any other manufacturer during cleaning cycles. The printers die a lot sooner when you use such aggressive cleaning cycles which go directly into the waste ink pad. However while it is annoying, the waste ink can make a mess or damage the entire printer if you don't hard stop it when they are full. Epson printers have an internal power supply, so things can get dangerous very quickly if the waste ink overflows and it comes it contact with the power supply.
All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but Epson is the most aboutaggressive in terms of stopping the printer when the counter is maxed out. This is made worse since they waste more ink then any other manufacturer during cleaning cycles. The printers die a lot sooner when you use such aggressive cleaning cycles which go directly into the waste ink pad. However while it is annoying, the waste ink can make a mess or damage the entire printer if you don't hard stop it when they are full. Epson printers have an internal power supply, so things can get dangerous very quickly if the waste ink overflows and it comes it contact with the power supply.
 
It seems like a lot of modern Epson printers (made within the past ~8-10 years) have reduced capacity waste ink pads when you compare them to older modes like the C88/+ and RXXX models, and old wide format machines. The counter limit has also been reduced to match. I have yet to find an older Epson printer (one worth using) that has a waste ink problem (LCD code, direct language or ink+paper light consistently blinking) with moderate use that ever has a waste ink issue, even after 10+ years of service and potentially plenty of printed pages. Yet these new ones with the reduced pads are known to crap out due to waste ink in 3-5 years. The days of the C88+ and machines like the R200 series (which only died due to waste ink with lots of use) went away with the wetness sensor printers (88/69/68) and were further reduced when they went to the newer chassis designs in 2010. The loss of the wetness sensor on the black cart printers hasn’t brought back the classic long life ones.
 
The issue is Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridge use for this exact reason. If they check, they will void the warranty even though they should be on the hook for proving it, they can get away with it by checking for that flag and charge you to replace it under warranty. These 3rd party CIS systems are not sanctioned by Epson - it’s only sanctioned in the ET series (which effectively have an internal CIS). That wouldn’t be an issue, but the repairs costs are about as much as another identical refurb. In addition, it can be quite difficult in the wide format (11x17 and larger) Epsons, as you need to partially tear the printer down to access the pads. It’s a labor and marketing scam problem.
 
Since the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest installing an external waste ink tank and resetting the counter. You can use a program like WIC reset utility to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it but you really should bypass the internal waste ink pad first. The saturated pad should be distrusted and treated as consumed to avoid a spill. '''Don't attempt this if you're worried about the warranty, since Epson will see it was reset and check if you replaced the waste ink pads or bypassed them.'''
 
If you can take apart the printer and find a set of used OEM ink that you can supply with the printer if they ask, they will likely replace the printer since they won't have an easy way to void your warranty since it’s a visual passing unit. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as an easy way to prove the printer was modified in an unapproved way.
 
Just to show you how bad the new ones (~2010+) are, I took my old NX230 apart that I'm throwing out because of electronic burning smell problems. This is how bad some of them are now:
 
[image|1279862]

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but Epson printers areis the most aggressive about stopping the printer when the counter says the pads are full and are notorious for putting as much ink in there asis maxed out. This is made worse since they can get away with to killwaste more ink then any other manufacturer during cleaning cycles. The printers die a lot sooner when you use such aggressive cleaning cycles which go directly into the printer as soon as possible. While it'swaste ink pad. However while it is annoying, the waste ink can make a mess or damage the entire printer if you don't hard stop it when the padsthey are full. Epson printers have an internal power supply, so things can get dangerous very quickly if the waste ink overflows and it comes it contact with the power supply.
All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but Epson printers areis the most aggressive about stopping the printer when the counter says the pads are full and are notorious for putting as much ink in there asis maxed out. This is made worse since they can get away with to killwaste more ink then any other manufacturer during cleaning cycles. The printers die a lot sooner when you use such aggressive cleaning cycles which go directly into the printer as soon as possible. While it'swaste ink pad. However while it is annoying, the waste ink can make a mess or damage the entire printer if you don't hard stop it when the padsthey are full. Epson printers have an internal power supply, so things can get dangerous very quickly if the waste ink overflows and it comes it contact with the power supply.
 
It seems like a lot of modern Epson printers (made within the past ~8-10 years) have reduced capacity waste ink pads when you compare them to older modes like the C88C88/+ and RXXX models, and old wide format machines. The counter limit has also been reduced to match :(match. I have yet to find an older Epson printer that’s(one worth usingusing) that has little toa waste ink problem (LCD code, direct language or ink+paper light consistently blinking) with moderate use reportingthat ever has a waste ink issue, even after 10+ years of service and potentially plenty of printed pages. Yet these new ones with the reduced pads are known to crap out due to waste ink pad is full likein 3-5 years. The days of the C88+ and machines like the R200 series (unless it was well used) orwhich only died due to waste ink with lots of use) went away with the pre wetness sensor models (Doesn’t use the 88/69/68printers (88/69/68) and it’s many modern replacements untilwere further reduced when they went to the newer chassis designs in 2010. The loss of the sensor-less black cart), but these new ones with small pads and wetness sensors drop like flies withsensor on the dreaded light combination in 3-5 years persistentlyblack cart printers hasn’t brought back the classic long life ones.
It seems like a lot of modern Epson printers (made within the past ~8-10 years) have reduced capacity waste ink pads when you compare them to older modes like the C88C88/+ and RXXX models, and old wide format machines. The counter limit has also been reduced to match :(match. I have yet to find an older Epson printer that’s(one worth usingusing) that has little toa waste ink problem (LCD code, direct language or ink+paper light consistently blinking) with moderate use reportingthat ever has a waste ink issue, even after 10+ years of service and potentially plenty of printed pages. Yet these new ones with the reduced pads are known to crap out due to waste ink pad is full likein 3-5 years. The days of the C88+ and machines like the R200 series (unless it was well used) orwhich only died due to waste ink with lots of use) went away with the pre wetness sensor models (Doesn’t use the 88/69/68printers (88/69/68) and it’s many modern replacements untilwere further reduced when they went to the newer chassis designs in 2010. The loss of the sensor-less black cart), but these new ones with small pads and wetness sensors drop like flies withsensor on the dreaded light combination in 3-5 years persistentlyblack cart printers hasn’t brought back the classic long life ones.
 
The issue is Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridge use for this exact reason. If they check, they will void the warranty even though they should be on the hook for proving it, they can get away with it by checking for that flag and charge you to replace it under warranty. These 3rd party CIS systems are not sanctioned by Epson - it’s only sanctioned in the ET series (which effectively have an internal CIS). That wouldn’t be an issue, but they charge more to replace it then itthe repairs costs to getare about as much as another refurb printer that’s identicalidentical refurb. In addition, it can be quite difficult in the 11x17+ Epson modelswide format (11x17 and larger) Epsons, as you need to partially tear the printer down to access the pads. It’s a labor and marketing scam problem.
The issue is Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridge use for this exact reason. If they check, they will void the warranty even though they should be on the hook for proving it, they can get away with it by checking for that flag and charge you to replace it under warranty. These 3rd party CIS systems are not sanctioned by Epson - it’s only sanctioned in the ET series (which effectively have an internal CIS). That wouldn’t be an issue, but they charge more to replace it then itthe repairs costs to getare about as much as another refurb printer that’s identicalidentical refurb. In addition, it can be quite difficult in the 11x17+ Epson modelswide format (11x17 and larger) Epsons, as you need to partially tear the printer down to access the pads. It’s a labor and marketing scam problem.
 
Since the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest installing an external waste ink tank and resetting the counter. You can use a program like WIC reset utility to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it but you really should bypass the internal waste ink pad first - best to NOT use thefirst. The saturated pad should be distrusted and treated as consumed to be safeavoid a spill. '''Don't attempt this if you're worried about the warranty, since Epson will see it was reset and check if you replaced the waste ink pads or bypassed them.'''
Since the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest installing an external waste ink tank and resetting the counter. You can use a program like WIC reset utility to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it but you really should bypass the internal waste ink pad first - best to NOT use thefirst. The saturated pad should be distrusted and treated as consumed to be safeavoid a spill. '''Don't attempt this if you're worried about the warranty, since Epson will see it was reset and check if you replaced the waste ink pads or bypassed them.'''
 
If you can take apart the printer and find a set of used OEM ink that you can supply with the printer if they ask, they will likely replace the printer since they won't have an easy way to void your warranty since it’s a visual passing unit. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as an easy way to prove the printer was modified in an unapproved way.
 
Just to show you how bad the new ones (~2010+) are, I took my old NX230 apart that I'm throwing out because of electronic burning smell problems. This is how bad some of them are now:
 
[image|1279862]

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but Epson printers are the most aggressive about stopping the printer when the counter says the pads are fullfull and are notorious for putting as much ink in there as they can get away with to kill the printer as soon as possible. While it's annoying, the waste ink can make a mess or damage the entire printer if you don't hard stop it when the pads are full. Epson printers have an internal power supply, so things can get dangerous very quickly if the waste ink overflows and it comes it contact with the power supply.
All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but Epson printers are the most aggressive about stopping the printer when the counter says the pads are fullfull and are notorious for putting as much ink in there as they can get away with to kill the printer as soon as possible. While it's annoying, the waste ink can make a mess or damage the entire printer if you don't hard stop it when the pads are full. Epson printers have an internal power supply, so things can get dangerous very quickly if the waste ink overflows and it comes it contact with the power supply.
 
It seems like a lot of modern Epson printers (made within the past ~8-10 years) have reduced capacity waste ink pads when you compare them to older modes like the C88 and RXXX models, and old wide format machines. The counter limit has also been reduced to match :(. I have yet to find an older Epson printer that’s worth using that has little to moderate use reporting the waste ink pad is full like the C88+ and R200 series (unless it was well used) or the pre wetness sensor models (Doesn’t use the 88/69/68 and it’s many modern replacements until the sensor-less black cart), but these new ones with small pads and wetness sensors drop like flies with the dreaded light combination in 3-5 years persistently.
 
The issue is Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridge use for this exact reason. If they check, they will void the warranty even though they should be on the hook for proving it, they can get away with it by checking for that flag and charge you to replace it under warranty. These 3rd party CIS systems are not sanctioned by Epson - it’s only sanctioned in the ET series (which effectively have an internal CIS). That wouldn’t be an issue, but they charge more to replace it then it costs to get another refurb printer that’s identical. In addition, it can be quite difficult in the 11x17+ Epson models as you need to partially tear the printer down to access the pads. It’s a labor and marketing scam problem.
 
Since the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest installing an external waste ink tank and resetting the counter. You can use a program like WIC reset utility to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it but you really should bypass the internal waste ink pad first - best to NOT use the saturated pad to be safe. '''Don't attempt this if you're worried about the warranty, since Epson will see it was reset and check if you replaced the waste ink pads or bypassed them.'''
 
If you can take apart the printer and find a set of used OEM ink that you can supply with the printer if they ask, they will likely replace the printer since they won't have an easy way to void your warranty since it’s a visual passing unit. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as an easy way to prove the printer was modified in an unapproved way.
 
Just to show you how bad the new ones (~2010+) are, I took my old NX230 apart that I'm throwing out because of electronic burning smell problems. This is how bad some of them are now:
 
[image|1279862]

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but Epson printers are the most aggressive about stopping the printer when the counter says the pads are full. While it's annoying, the waste ink can make a mess or damage the entire printer if you don't hard stop it when the pads are full. Epson printers have an internal power supply, so things can get dangerous very quickly if the waste ink overflows and it comes it contact with the power supply.
 
It seems like a lot of modern Epson printers (made within the past ~8-10 years) have reduced capacity waste ink pads when you compare them to older modes like the C88 and RXXX models, and old wide format machines. The counter limit has also been reduced to match :(. I have yet to find an older Epson printer that’s worth using that has little to moderate use reporting the waste ink pad is full like the C88+ and R200 series (unless it was well used) and even theor the pre wetness sensor (88/69/68) modelsmodels (Doesn’t use the 88/69/68 and it’s many modern replacements until the sensor-less black cart), but these new ones with small pads and wetness sensors drop like flies with the dreaded lightslight combination in 3-5 years persistently.
It seems like a lot of modern Epson printers (made within the past ~8-10 years) have reduced capacity waste ink pads when you compare them to older modes like the C88 and RXXX models, and old wide format machines. The counter limit has also been reduced to match :(. I have yet to find an older Epson printer that’s worth using that has little to moderate use reporting the waste ink pad is full like the C88+ and R200 series (unless it was well used) and even theor the pre wetness sensor (88/69/68) modelsmodels (Doesn’t use the 88/69/68 and it’s many modern replacements until the sensor-less black cart), but these new ones with small pads and wetness sensors drop like flies with the dreaded lightslight combination in 3-5 years persistently.
 
The issue is Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridge use for this exact reason. If they check, they will void the warranty even though they should be on the hook for proving it, they can get away with it by checking for that flag and charge you to replace it under warranty. These 3rd party CIS systems are not sanctioned by Epson - it’s only sanctioned in the ET series (which effectively have an internal CIS). That wouldn’t be an issue, but they charge more to replace it then it costs to get another refurb printer that’s identical. In addition, it can be quite difficult in the 11x17+ Epson models as you need to partially tear the printer down to access the pads. It’s a labor and marketing scam problem.
 
Since the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest installing an external waste ink tank and resetting the counter. You can use a program like WIC reset utility to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it but you really should bypass the internal waste ink pad first - best to NOT use the saturated pad to be safe. '''Don't attempt this if you're worried about the warranty, since Epson will see it was reset and check if you replaced the waste ink pads or bypassed them.'''
 
If you can take apart the printer and find a set of used OEM ink that you can supply with the printer if they ask, they will likely replace the printer since they won't have an easy way to void your warranty since it’s a visual passing unit. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as an easy way to prove the printer was modified in an unapproved way.
 
Just to show you how bad the new ones (~2010+) are, I took my old NX230 apart that I'm throwing out because of electronic burning smell problems. This is how bad some of them are now:
 
[image|1279862]

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but Epson printers are the most aggressive about stopping the printer when the counter says the pads are full. While it's annoying, the waste ink can make a mess or damage the entire printer if you don't hard stop it when the pads are full. Epson printers have an internal power supply, so things can get dangerous very quickly if the waste ink overflows and it comes it contact with the power supply.
It seems like a lot of modern Epson printers (made within the past ~8-10 years) have reduced capacity waste ink pads when you compare them to the older modes like the C88 series. As a result of the shrinking waste ink pad, the counter before it says the pads are used up and need to be replaced has also been reduced accordingly. I have yet to find an older Epson printer that has little to moderate use reporting the waste ink pad is full (it only really happens with heavy use on the older printers). While the old ones rarely have this problem, I see it a lot more often on these new ones with reduced capacity waste ink pads.
 
Epson is going to know you usedIt seems like a CIS because theselot of modern Epson printers log "non genuine" cartridges, so it is likely that Epson will void your warranty if Epson checks(made within the flags stored in the printer. CIS systems are not sanctioned by Epson outside of the ET series (these essentiallypast ~8-10 years) have an internal CIS installed by Epson from the factory). If they check this they will chargereduced capacity waste ink pads when you compare them to replaceolder modes like the printersC88 and RXXX models, and old wide format machines. The problem is it will cost morecounter limit has also been reduced to repair/replace them then it willmatch :(. I have yet to buy a newfind an older Epson printer and start over. This mainlythat’s worth using that has little to do with the difficulty of replacingmoderate use reporting the waste ink pad. The parts are probably going to be cheappad is full like the C88+ and R200 series (unless it was well used) and even the pre wetness sensor (88/69/68) models, but they will get you on laborthese new ones drop like flies with the dreaded lights in 3-5 years persistently.
Epson is going to know you usedIt seems like a CIS because theselot of modern Epson printers log "non genuine" cartridges, so it is likely that Epson will void your warranty if Epson checks(made within the flags stored in the printer. CIS systems are not sanctioned by Epson outside of the ET series (these essentiallypast ~8-10 years) have an internal CIS installed by Epson from the factory). If they check this they will chargereduced capacity waste ink pads when you compare them to replaceolder modes like the printersC88 and RXXX models, and old wide format machines. The problem is it will cost morecounter limit has also been reduced to repair/replace them then it willmatch :(. I have yet to buy a newfind an older Epson printer and start over. This mainlythat’s worth using that has little to do with the difficulty of replacingmoderate use reporting the waste ink pad. The parts are probably going to be cheappad is full like the C88+ and R200 series (unless it was well used) and even the pre wetness sensor (88/69/68) models, but they will get you on laborthese new ones drop like flies with the dreaded lights in 3-5 years persistently.
 
Since the odds of Epson voidingThe issue is Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridge use for this exact reason. If they check, they will void the warranty even though they should be on the hook for proving it, they can get away with it by checking for that flag and charge you to replace it under warranty. These 3rd party CIS systems are not sanctioned by Epson - it’s only sanctioned in your favor, I'd suggest installingthe ET series (which effectively have an external waste ink tank and doing a WIC reset. You can use a program like [http://resetkey.net/download|WIC reset utility]internal CIS). That wouldn’t be an issue, but they charge more to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a keyreplace it then it costs to resetget another refurb printer that’s identical. In addition, it but you really should bypasscan be quite difficult in the internal waste ink pad first. Don't attempt this if you're worried about the warranty, since11x17+ Epson will see it was reset and check ifmodels as you replacedneed to partially tear the waste ink pads or bypassed themprinter down to access the pads. It’s a labor and marketing scam problem.
Since the odds of Epson voidingThe issue is Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridge use for this exact reason. If they check, they will void the warranty even though they should be on the hook for proving it, they can get away with it by checking for that flag and charge you to replace it under warranty. These 3rd party CIS systems are not sanctioned by Epson - it’s only sanctioned in your favor, I'd suggest installingthe ET series (which effectively have an external waste ink tank and doing a WIC reset. You can use a program like [http://resetkey.net/download|WIC reset utility]internal CIS). That wouldn’t be an issue, but they charge more to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a keyreplace it then it costs to resetget another refurb printer that’s identical. In addition, it but you really should bypasscan be quite difficult in the internal waste ink pad first. Don't attempt this if you're worried about the warranty, since11x17+ Epson will see it was reset and check ifmodels as you replacedneed to partially tear the waste ink pads or bypassed themprinter down to access the pads. It’s a labor and marketing scam problem.
 
IfSince the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest installing an external waste ink tank and resetting the counter. You can use a program like WIC reset utility to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it but you really should bypass the internal waste ink pad first - best to NOT use the saturated pad to be safe. '''Don't attempt this if you're worried about the warranty, since Epson will see it was reset and check if you replaced the waste ink pads or bypassed them.'''

If
you can take apart the printer and find a set of used OEM ink that you can supply with the printer if they ask, they will likely replace the printer since they won't have an easy way to void your warrantywarranty since it’s a visual passing unit. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as an easy way to prove the printer was modified in an unapproved way.
IfSince the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest installing an external waste ink tank and resetting the counter. You can use a program like WIC reset utility to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it but you really should bypass the internal waste ink pad first - best to NOT use the saturated pad to be safe. '''Don't attempt this if you're worried about the warranty, since Epson will see it was reset and check if you replaced the waste ink pads or bypassed them.'''

If
you can take apart the printer and find a set of used OEM ink that you can supply with the printer if they ask, they will likely replace the printer since they won't have an easy way to void your warrantywarranty since it’s a visual passing unit. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as an easy way to prove the printer was modified in an unapproved way.
 
Just to show you how bad the new ones (~2010+) are, I took my old NX230 apart that I'm throwing out because of electronic burning smell problems. This is how bad some of them are now:
 
[image|1279862]

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but it seems like Epson isprinters are the most aggressive about making surestopping the printer no longer operates oncewhen the printer determinescounter says the waste ink pads are full. They do this because if you runWhile it's annoying, the printer too long past the "safe" fill level of the specific printer you have, these padswaste ink can flood over and make a mess of your desk. In a worst case scenario,or damage the entire printer if you coulddon't hard stop it when the pads are full. Epson printers have an internal power supply, so things can get dangerous very quickly if the waste ink near components likeoverflows and it comes it contact with the internal power supply. I'm convinced
It seems like a lot of modern
Epson has shrankprinters (made within the past ~8-10 years) have reduced capacity waste ink pads sincewhen you compare them to the T048/60 days and shortenedolder modes like the threshold beforeC88 series. As a result of the printer demands newshrinking waste ink pads. I NEVER see those old Epsons with this problem but these new onespad, the counter before it says the pads are more likelyused up and need to be replaced has also been reduced accordingly. I have ayet to find an older Epson printer that has little to moderate use reporting the waste ink problem. Thepad is full (it only time itreally happens with heavy use on the older printers). While the old ones is after years of hard userarely have this problem, I see it a lot more often on these new ones with reduced capacity waste ink pads.
All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but it seems like Epson isprinters are the most aggressive about making surestopping the printer no longer operates oncewhen the printer determinescounter says the waste ink pads are full. They do this because if you runWhile it's annoying, the printer too long past the "safe" fill level of the specific printer you have, these padswaste ink can flood over and make a mess of your desk. In a worst case scenario,or damage the entire printer if you coulddon't hard stop it when the pads are full. Epson printers have an internal power supply, so things can get dangerous very quickly if the waste ink near components likeoverflows and it comes it contact with the internal power supply. I'm convinced
It seems like a lot of modern
Epson has shrankprinters (made within the past ~8-10 years) have reduced capacity waste ink pads sincewhen you compare them to the T048/60 days and shortenedolder modes like the threshold beforeC88 series. As a result of the printer demands newshrinking waste ink pads. I NEVER see those old Epsons with this problem but these new onespad, the counter before it says the pads are more likelyused up and need to be replaced has also been reduced accordingly. I have ayet to find an older Epson printer that has little to moderate use reporting the waste ink problem. Thepad is full (it only time itreally happens with heavy use on the older printers). While the old ones is after years of hard userarely have this problem, I see it a lot more often on these new ones with reduced capacity waste ink pads.
 
Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridges, so it is likely that Epson will void your warranty sinceif Epson doeschecks the flags stored in the printer. CIS systems are not sanction these things (outsidesanctioned by Epson outside of the ET series printers, which(these essentially have an internal CIS) andCIS installed by Epson from the factory). If they check this they will charge you to replace the printers. ItThe problem is it will cost more to repairrepair/replace them then it will to replace them because of how hard it is to getbuy a new printer and start over. This mainly has to do with the waste ink pads. Labor isdifficulty of replacing the major thing that bites with waste ink pad replacementpad. The parts are probably going to be cheap but they will get you on labor.
Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridges, so it is likely that Epson will void your warranty sinceif Epson doeschecks the flags stored in the printer. CIS systems are not sanction these things (outsidesanctioned by Epson outside of the ET series printers, which(these essentially have an internal CIS) andCIS installed by Epson from the factory). If they check this they will charge you to replace the printers. ItThe problem is it will cost more to repairrepair/replace them then it will to replace them because of how hard it is to getbuy a new printer and start over. This mainly has to do with the waste ink pads. Labor isdifficulty of replacing the major thing that bites with waste ink pad replacementpad. The parts are probably going to be cheap but they will get you on labor.
 
Since the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest installing an external waste ink tank and doing a WIC reset. You can use a program like [http://resetkey.net/download|WIC reset utility] to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it oncebut you bypassedreally should bypass the internal waste ink pad. Ifpad first. Don't attempt this if you're worried about the warranty, I would not attempt this since waste ink resets are likely logged and theyEpson will know tosee it was reset and check if you followed procedure and replaced the padswaste ink pads or bypassed them.
Since the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest installing an external waste ink tank and doing a WIC reset. You can use a program like [http://resetkey.net/download|WIC reset utility] to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it oncebut you bypassedreally should bypass the internal waste ink pad. Ifpad first. Don't attempt this if you're worried about the warranty, I would not attempt this since waste ink resets are likely logged and theyEpson will know tosee it was reset and check if you followed procedure and replaced the padswaste ink pads or bypassed them.
 
If you can take apart the printer and find a set of used OEM ink that you can put insupply with the printer and are able to open it, you can put a set of used ink in there to avoid giving Epsonif they ask, they will likely replace the printer since they won't have an easy outway to void your warranty. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as it's also an easy way out of honoringto prove the warrantyprinter was modified in an unapproved way.
If you can take apart the printer and find a set of used OEM ink that you can put insupply with the printer and are able to open it, you can put a set of used ink in there to avoid giving Epsonif they ask, they will likely replace the printer since they won't have an easy outway to void your warranty. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as it's also an easy way out of honoringto prove the warrantyprinter was modified in an unapproved way.
 
Just to show you how bad the new ones (~2010+) are, I took my old NX230 apart that I'm throwing out because of electronic burning smell problems. This is how bad some of them are now:
 
[image|1279862]

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but it seems like Epson is the most aggressive about making sure the printer no longer operates once the printer determines the waste ink pads are full. They do this because if you run the printer too long past the "safe" fill level of the specific printer you have, these pads can flood over and make a mess of your desk. In a worst case scenario, you could get waste ink near components like the internal power supply. I'm convinced Epson has shrank the pads since the T048T048/60 days and shortened the threshold before the printer demands new waste ink pads. I NEVER see those old Epsons with this problem but these new ones are more likely to have a waste ink problem. The only time it happens on the old ones is after years of hard use.
All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but it seems like Epson is the most aggressive about making sure the printer no longer operates once the printer determines the waste ink pads are full. They do this because if you run the printer too long past the "safe" fill level of the specific printer you have, these pads can flood over and make a mess of your desk. In a worst case scenario, you could get waste ink near components like the internal power supply. I'm convinced Epson has shrank the pads since the T048T048/60 days and shortened the threshold before the printer demands new waste ink pads. I NEVER see those old Epsons with this problem but these new ones are more likely to have a waste ink problem. The only time it happens on the old ones is after years of hard use.
 
Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridges, so it is likely that Epson will void your warranty since Epson does not sanction these things (outside of ET series printers, which essentially have an internal CIS) and they will charge you to replace the printers. It will cost more to repair them then it will to replace them because of how hard it is to get to the waste ink pads. Labor is the major thing that bites with waste ink pad replacement.
 
Since the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest an external waste ink tank and a WIC reset. You can use a program like [http://resetkey.net/download|WIC reset utility] to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it once you bypassed the internal waste ink pad. If you're worried about the warranty, I would not attempt this since waste ink resets are likely logged and they will know to check if you followed procedure and replaced the pads.
 
If you can take apart the printer and find a set of ink you can put in the printer and are able to open it, you can put a set of used ink in there to avoid giving Epson an easy out to void your warranty. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as it's also an easy way out of honoring the warranty.
Just
Just
to show you how bad the new ones (~2010+) are, I took my old NX230 apart that I'm throwing out because of electronic burning smell problems. This is how bad some of them are now: [image|1279862

[image|1279862
]
Just
Just
to show you how bad the new ones (~2010+) are, I took my old NX230 apart that I'm throwing out because of electronic burning smell problems. This is how bad some of them are now: [image|1279862

[image|1279862
]

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but it seems like Epson is the most aggressive about making sure the printer no longer operates once the printer determines the waste ink pads are full. They do this because if you run the printer too long past the "safe" fill level of the specific printer you have, these pads can flood over and make a mess of your desk. In a worst case scenario, you could get waste ink near components like the internal power supply. I'm convinced Epson has shrank the pads since the T048 days and shortened the threshold before the printer demands new waste ink pads. I NEVER see those old Epsons with this problem but these new ones are more likely to have a waste ink problem. The only time it happens on the old ones is after years of hard use.
 
Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridges, so it is likely that Epson will void your warranty since Epson does not sanction these things (outside of ET series printers, which essentially have an internal CIS) and they will charge you to replace the printers. It will cost more to repair them then it will to replace them because of how hard it is to get to the waste ink pads. Labor is the major thing that bites with waste ink pad replacement.
 
Since the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest an external waste ink tank and a WIC reset. You can use a program like [http://resetkey.net/download|WIC reset utility] to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it once you bypassed the internal waste ink pad. If you're worried about the warranty, I would not attempt this since waste ink resets are likely logged and they will know to check if you followed procedure and replaced the pads.
 
If you can take apart the printer and find a set of ink you can put in the printer and are able to open it, you can put a set of used ink in there to avoid giving Epson an easy out to void your warranty. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as it's also an easy way out of honoring the warranty.
Just to show you how bad the new ones (~2010+) are, I took my old NX230 apart that I'm throwing out because of electronic burning smell problems. This is how bad some of them are now: [image|1279862]

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but it seems like Epson is the most aggressive about making sure the printer no longer operates once the printer determines the waste ink pads are full. They do this because if you run the printer too long past the "safe" fill level of the specific printer you have, these pads can flood over and make a mess of your desk. In a worst case scenario, you could get waste ink near components like the internal power supply. I'm convinced Epson has shrank the pads since the T048 days and shortened the threshold before the printer demands new waste ink pads. I NEVER see those old Epsons with this problem but these new ones are more likely to have a waste ink problem. The only time it happens on the old ones is after years of hard use.
All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but it seems like Epson is the most aggressive about making sure the printer no longer operates once the printer determines the waste ink pads are full. They do this because if you run the printer too long past the "safe" fill level of the specific printer you have, these pads can flood over and make a mess of your desk. In a worst case scenario, you could get waste ink near components like the internal power supply. I'm convinced Epson has shrank the pads since the T048 days and shortened the threshold before the printer demands new waste ink pads. I NEVER see those old Epsons with this problem but these new ones are more likely to have a waste ink problem. The only time it happens on the old ones is after years of hard use.
 
Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridges, so it is likely that Epson will void your warranty since Epson does not sanction these things (outside of ET series printers, which essentially have an internal CIS) and they will charge you to replace the printers. It will cost more to repair them then it will to replace them because of how hard it is to get to the waste ink pads. Labor is the major thing that bites with waste ink pad replacement.
 
Since the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest an external waste ink tank and a WIC reset. You can use a program like [http://resetkey.net/download|WIC reset utility] to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it once you bypassed the internal waste ink pad. If you're worried about the warranty, I would not attempt this since waste ink resets are likely logged and they will know to check if you followed procedure and replaced the pads.
 
If you can take apart the printer and find a set of ink you can put in the printer and are able to open it, you can put a set of used ink in there to avoid giving Epson an easy out to void your warranty. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as it's also an easy way out of honoring the warranty.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but it seems like Epson is the most aggressive about making sure the printer no longer operates once the printer determines the waste ink pads are full. They do this because if you run the printer too long past the "safe" fill level of the specific printer you have, these pads can flood over and make a mess of your desk. In a worst case scenario, you could get waste ink near components like the internal power supply. I'm convinced Epson has shrank the pads since the T048 days and shortened the threshold before the printer demands new waste ink pads. I NEVER see those old Epsons with this problem but these new ones are more likely to have a waste ink problem.
All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but it seems like Epson is the most aggressive about making sure the printer no longer operates once the printer determines the waste ink pads are full. They do this because if you run the printer too long past the "safe" fill level of the specific printer you have, these pads can flood over and make a mess of your desk. In a worst case scenario, you could get waste ink near components like the internal power supply. I'm convinced Epson has shrank the pads since the T048 days and shortened the threshold before the printer demands new waste ink pads. I NEVER see those old Epsons with this problem but these new ones are more likely to have a waste ink problem.
 
Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridges, so it is likely that Epson will void your warranty since Epson does not sanction these things (outside of ET series printers, which essentially have an internal CIS) and they will charge you to replace the printers. It will cost more to repair them then it will to replace them because of how hard it is to get to the waste ink pads. Labor is the major thing that bites with waste ink pad replacement.
 
Since the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest an external waste ink tank and a WIC reset. You can use a program like [http://resetkey.net/download|WIC reset utility] to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it once you bypassed the internal waste ink pad. If you're worried about the warranty, I would not attempt this since waste ink resets are likely logged and they will know to check if you followed procedure and replaced the pads.
 
If you can take apart the printer and find a set of ink you can put in the printer and are able to open it, you can put a set of used ink in there to avoid giving Epson an easy out to void your warranty. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as it's also an easy way out of honoring the warranty.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but it seems like Epson is the most aggressive about making sure the printer no longer operates once the printer determines the waste ink pads are full. They do this because if you run the printer too long past the "safe" fill level of the specific printer you have, these pads can flood over and make a mess of your desk. In a worst case scenario, you could get waste ink near components like the internal power supply.
 
Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridges, so it is likely that Epson will void your warranty since Epson does not sanction these things (outside of ET series printers, which essentially have an internal CIS) and they will charge you to replace the printers. It will cost more to repair them then it will to replace them because of how hard it is to get to the waste ink pads. Labor is the major thing that bites with waste ink pad replacement.
 
Since the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest an external waste ink tank and a WIC reset. You can use a program like [http://resetkey.net/download|WIC reset utility] to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it once you bypassed the internal waste ink pad. If you're worried about the warranty, I would not attempt this since WICwaste ink resets are likely logged and they will know to check if you followed procedure and replaced the pads.
Since the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest an external waste ink tank and a WIC reset. You can use a program like [http://resetkey.net/download|WIC reset utility] to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a key to reset it once you bypassed the internal waste ink pad. If you're worried about the warranty, I would not attempt this since WICwaste ink resets are likely logged and they will know to check if you followed procedure and replaced the pads.
 
If you can take apart the printer and find a set of ink you can put in the printer and are able to open it, you can put a set of used ink in there to avoid giving Epson an easy out to void your warranty. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as it's also an easy way out of honoring the warranty.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but it seems like Epson is the most aggressive about making sure the printer no longer operates once the printer determines the waste ink pads are full. They do this because if you run the printer too long past the "safe" fill level of the specific printer you have, these pads can flood over and make a mess of your desk. In a worst case scenario, you could get waste ink near components like the internal power supply.
 
Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridges, so it is likely that Epson will void your warranty since Epson does not sanction these things (outside of ET series printers, which essentially have an internal CIS) and they will charge you to replace the printers. It will cost more to repair them then it will to replace them because of how hard it is to get to the waste ink pads. Labor is the major thing that bites with waste ink pad replacement.
Since
Since
the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest an external waste ink tank and a WIC reset. You can use a program like [http://resetkey.net/download|WIC reset utility] to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a trial key to reset it once you bypassed the internal waste ink pad. If you're worried about the warranty, I would not attempt this since WIC resets are likely logged and they will know to check if you followed procedure and replaced the pads.
Since
Since
the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest an external waste ink tank and a WIC reset. You can use a program like [http://resetkey.net/download|WIC reset utility] to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a trial key to reset it once you bypassed the internal waste ink pad. If you're worried about the warranty, I would not attempt this since WIC resets are likely logged and they will know to check if you followed procedure and replaced the pads.
 
If you can take apart the printer and find a set of ink you can put in the printer and are able to open it, you can put a set of used ink in there to avoid giving Epson an easy out to void your warranty. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as it's also an easy way out of honoring the warranty.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but it seems like Epson is the most aggressive about making sure the printer no longer operates once the printer determines the waste ink pads are full. They do this because if you run the printer too long past the "safe" fill level of the specific printer you have, these pads can flood over and make a mess of your desk. In a worst case scenario, you could get waste ink near components like the internal power supply.
 
Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridges, so it is likely that Epson will void your warranty since Epson does not sanction these things (outside of ET series printers, which essentially have an internal CIS) and they will charge you to replace the printers. It will cost more to repair them then it will to replace them because of how hard it is to get to the waste ink pads. Labor is the major thing that bites with waste ink pad replacement.
Since the odds of Epson voiding the warranty are not in your favor, I'd suggest an external waste ink tank and a WIC reset. You can use a program like [http://resetkey.net/download|WIC reset utility] to check the waste ink pad levels and if it's full, purchase a trial key to reset it once you bypassed the internal waste ink pad.
 
If you can take apart the printer and find a set of ink you can put in the printer and are able to open it, you can put a set of used ink in there to avoid giving Epson an easy out to void your warranty. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as it's also an easy way out of honoring the warranty.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but it seems like Epson is the most aggressive about making sure the printer no longer operates once the printer determines the waste ink pads are full. They do this because if you run the printer too long past the "safe" fill level of the specific printer you have, these pads can flood over and make a mess of your desk. In a worst case scenario, you could get waste ink near components like the internal power supply.
 
Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridges, so it is likely that Epson will void your warranty since Epson does not sanction these things (outside of ET series printers, which essentially have an internal CIS) and they will charge you to replace the printers. It will cost more to repair them then it will to replace them because of how hard it is to get to the waste ink pads. IfLabor is the major thing that bites with waste ink pad replacement.
If
you can take apart the printer and find a set of ink you can put in the printer and are able to open it, you can put a set of used ink in there to avoid giving Epson an easy out to void your warranty. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as it's also an easy way out of honoring the warranty.
Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridges, so it is likely that Epson will void your warranty since Epson does not sanction these things (outside of ET series printers, which essentially have an internal CIS) and they will charge you to replace the printers. It will cost more to repair them then it will to replace them because of how hard it is to get to the waste ink pads. IfLabor is the major thing that bites with waste ink pad replacement.
If
you can take apart the printer and find a set of ink you can put in the printer and are able to open it, you can put a set of used ink in there to avoid giving Epson an easy out to void your warranty. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as it's also an easy way out of honoring the warranty.

Durum:

open

Orijinal gönderinin sahibi: Nick ,

Metin:

All inkjet printers have these "waste ink pads", but it seems like Epson is the most aggressive about making sure the printer no longer operates once the printer determines the waste ink pads are full. They do this because if you run the printer too long past the "safe" fill level of the specific printer you have, these pads can flood over and make a mess of your desk. In a worst case scenario, you could get waste ink near components like the internal power supply.

Epson is going to know you used a CIS because these printers log "non genuine" cartridges, so it is likely that Epson will void your warranty since Epson does not sanction these things (outside of ET series printers, which essentially have an internal CIS) and they will charge you to replace the printers. It will cost more to repair them then it will to replace them because of how hard it is to get to the waste ink pads. If you can take apart the printer and find a set of ink you can put in the printer and are able to open it, you can put a set of used ink in there to avoid giving Epson an easy out to void your warranty. You'll also want to remove the CIS mounting clips, as these will be used against you as it's also an easy way out of honoring the warranty.

Durum:

open