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Güncel sürümün sahibi: Minho ,

Metin:

Hmm...full disclosure, I do not generally work on Nexus devices.
-However, the voltage indicated on a battery is the nominal voltage, you can read up on it [http://batteryuniversity.com/index.php/learn/article/confusion_with_voltages|here]. A fully charged Li-ion battery will always be higher than the nominal voltage, typically around 4.2V. So if you are measuring 4.1V (with the battery disconnected), then there doesn't appear to be anything wrong with your battery, at least from a charge perspective. There may be an issue with the gas gauge though. As Scott suggests, trying a new or known-good battery is always a good first step.
+However, the voltage indicated on a battery is the nominal voltage, you can read up on it [http://batteryuniversity.com/index.php/learn/article/confusion_with_voltages|here]. A fully charged Li-ion battery will always be higher than the nominal voltage, typically around 4.2V. So if you are measuring 4.1V (with the battery disconnected), then there doesn't appear to be anything wrong with your battery, at least from a charge perspective. There may be an issue with the gas gauge though. Trying a new or known-good battery is always a good first step...
For perspective, an iPhone battery has a nominal voltage of ~3.8V and fully charged it is ~4.2V. When the battery is below 3.5 V, that's when it shows less then 5-10% charge. Anything much lower than that, and the phone will not boot.

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Orijinal gönderinin sahibi: Minho ,

Metin:

Hmm...full disclosure, I do not generally work on Nexus devices.

However, the voltage indicated on a battery is the nominal voltage, you can read up on it [http://batteryuniversity.com/index.php/learn/article/confusion_with_voltages|here]. A fully charged Li-ion battery will always be higher than the nominal voltage, typically around 4.2V. So if you are measuring 4.1V (with the battery disconnected), then there doesn't appear to be anything wrong with your battery, at least from a charge perspective. There may be an issue with the gas gauge though. As Scott suggests, trying a new or known-good battery is always a good first step.

For perspective, an iPhone battery has a nominal voltage of ~3.8V and fully charged it is ~4.2V. When the battery is below 3.5 V, that's when it shows less then 5-10% charge. Anything much lower than that, and the phone will not boot.

Durum:

open