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Güncel sürümün sahibi: leah4 ,

Metin:

It would be interesting to know whether the Levi's warranty covers this, so please let us know.
 
You could certainly try the iron on or sewing route. The iron-on patch starts to curl away from the fabric after a few washings anyway, so it's best to sew around the edge of the patch no matter which method you choose. How are your sewing skills? Do you have access to a machine? Let me know if you would like instructions for repair by hand or machine.
 
Having said all that, it might be that the fabric is wearing out and new holes will soon appear regardless of the repair. The denim that jeans are made of today is just not as strong as in the old days. Those old "dungarees" were stiff and tough to break in, but the fabric lasted forever. Now jeans fabric is pre-stressed to make them soft, so they are actually already somewhat worn out before we buy them. Then we put them over and over again in an "agitator" washing machine, stressing the fabric even more. (Front-loading machines are easier on clothes and use less detergent and water).
 
What to do now? Well, you can save them so you'll have some denim to patch future pairs with, cut them up for some heavy-duty cleaning cloths, or put them in one of those clothing donation collection boxes that you see sometimes in parking lots. The jeans may not be wearable anymore, but if you donate them they eventually make their way to a company that will shred them for use as all sorts of stuffingstuffing and insulation. Even worn-out fabric is valuable to them and is never wasted.
What to do now? Well, you can save them so you'll have some denim to patch future pairs with, cut them up for some heavy-duty cleaning cloths, or put them in one of those clothing donation collection boxes that you see sometimes in parking lots. The jeans may not be wearable anymore, but if you donate them they eventually make their way to a company that will shred them for use as all sorts of stuffingstuffing and insulation. Even worn-out fabric is valuable to them and is never wasted.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: leah4 ,

Metin:

It would be interesting to know whether the Levi's warranty covers this, so please let us know.
 
You could certainly try the iron on or sewing route. The iron oniron-on patch starts to curl away from the fabric after a few washings anyway, so it's best to sew around the edge of the patch no matter which method you choose. How are your sewing skills? Do you have access to a machine? Let me know if you would like instructions for repair by hand or machine.
You could certainly try the iron on or sewing route. The iron oniron-on patch starts to curl away from the fabric after a few washings anyway, so it's best to sew around the edge of the patch no matter which method you choose. How are your sewing skills? Do you have access to a machine? Let me know if you would like instructions for repair by hand or machine.
 
Having said all that, it might be that the fabric is wearing out and new holes will soon appear regardless of the repair. The denim that jeans are made of today is just not as strong as in the old days. Those old "dungarees" were stiff and tough to break in, but the fabric lasted forever. Now jeans fabric is pre-stressed to make them soft, so they are actually already somewhat worn out before we buy them. Then we put them over and over again in an "agitator" washing machine, stressing the fabric even more. (Front-loading machines are easier on clothes and use less detergent and water).
 
What to do now? Well, you can save them so you'll have some denim to patch future pairs with, cut them up for some heavy-duty cleaning cloths, or put them in one of those clothing donation collection boxes that you see sometimes in parking lots. The jeans may not be wearable anymore, but if you donate them they eventually make their way to a company that will shred them for use as all sorts of stuffing. Even worn-out fabric is valuable to them and is never wasted.

Durum:

open

Orijinal gönderinin sahibi: leah4 ,

Metin:

It would be interesting to know whether the Levi's warranty covers this, so please let us know. 

You could certainly try the iron on or sewing route. The iron on patch starts to curl away from the fabric after a few washings anyway, so it's best to sew around the edge of the patch no matter which method you choose. How are your sewing skills? Do you have access to a machine? Let me know if you would like instructions for repair by hand or machine.

Having said all that, it might be that the fabric is wearing out and new holes will soon appear regardless of the repair. The denim that jeans are made of today is just not as strong as in the old days. Those old "dungarees" were stiff and tough to break in, but the fabric lasted forever. Now jeans fabric is pre-stressed to make them soft, so they are actually already somewhat worn out before we buy them. Then we put them over and over again in an "agitator" washing machine, stressing the fabric even more. (Front-loading machines are easier on clothes and use less detergent and water).

What to do now? Well, you can save them so you'll have some denim to patch future pairs with, cut them up for some heavy-duty cleaning cloths, or put them in one of those clothing donation collection boxes that you see sometimes in parking lots. The jeans may not be wearable anymore, but if you donate them they eventually make their way to a company that will shred them for use as all sorts of stuffing. Even worn-out fabric is valuable to them and is never wasted.

Durum:

open