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Güncel sürümün sahibi: Nick ,

Metin:

Listen to the hard drive - with the visual Toshiba BIOS (HSW/AMD-present), No OS and failed hard drive conditions load the BIOS as the fallback. It usually happens under 3 conditions:
* Drive failure (most common)
* No OS (boot file corruption, or the system was erased. More effective then “No boot device found” errors. This can indicate a secondhand unit erased by the previous owner too)
* No drive installed/detected (Used laptop where the drive was pulled, or failed and the previous owner sold it with the bad drive installed)
-The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality. When these laptops were new, many of them had an issue with the original HD within 1.5-2 years consistently. At this point, many of these Toshiba laptops with these junky factory original Toshiba HDs are dying in droves with the same POST errors - mainly “no POST”, “No boot device”, or going to BIOS as they age, or it died for the original owner and was purchased used that way by someone who wants to repair it. ***''Yes, I could easily score a unit with top end specs and fix it with an NVMe SSD and a 256GB scratch SSD, but I do not buy Toshiba/Dynabook new OR used out of principle.''***
+The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality. When these laptops were new, many of them had an issue with the original HD within 1.5-2 years consistently. At this point, many of these Toshiba laptops with these Toshiba laptops with original HDs are dying in droves with the same POST errors - mainly “no POST”, “No boot device”, or going to BIOS as they age, or it died for the original owner and was purchased used that way by someone who wants to repair it. ***''Yes, I could easily score a unit with top end specs and fix it with an NVMe SSD and a 256GB scratch SSD, but I do not buy Toshiba/Dynabook new OR used out of principle.''***
***A lot of newer laptops - not just Toshiba have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s increasingly becoming expected behavior.*** If you have a AMI skin Toshiba, these still use the traditional POST messaging. Dell also does it on the newer SupportAssist UEFI machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed, or if you use Dell Data Wipe). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

Listen to the hard drive - with the visual Toshiba BIOS (HSW/AMD-present), No OS and failed hard drive conditions load the BIOS as the fallback. It usually happens under 3 conditions:
* Drive failure (most common)
* No OS (boot file corruption, or the system was erased. More effective then “No boot device found” errors. This can indicate a secondhand unit erased by the previous owner too)
* No drive installed/detected (Used laptop where the drive was pulled, or failed and the previous owner sold it with the bad drive installed)
-The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality. When these laptops were new, many of them had an issue with the original HD within 1.5-2 years consistently. At this point, many of these Toshiba laptops with these junky factory original Toshiba HDs are dying in droves with the same POST errors - mainly “no POST”, “No boot device”, or going to BIOS as they age, or it died for the original owner and was purchased used that way by someone who wants to repair it. ***''Yes, I could easily score a unit with top end specs and fix it with an NVMe SSD and a 256GB boot SSD, but I do not buy Toshiba/Dynabook new OR used out of principle.''***
+The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality. When these laptops were new, many of them had an issue with the original HD within 1.5-2 years consistently. At this point, many of these Toshiba laptops with these junky factory original Toshiba HDs are dying in droves with the same POST errors - mainly “no POST”, “No boot device”, or going to BIOS as they age, or it died for the original owner and was purchased used that way by someone who wants to repair it. ***''Yes, I could easily score a unit with top end specs and fix it with an NVMe SSD and a 256GB scratch SSD, but I do not buy Toshiba/Dynabook new OR used out of principle.''***
***A lot of newer laptops - not just Toshiba have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s increasingly becoming expected behavior.*** If you have a AMI skin Toshiba, these still use the traditional POST messaging. Dell also does it on the newer SupportAssist UEFI machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed, or if you use Dell Data Wipe). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

Listen to the hard drive - with the visual Toshiba BIOS (HSW/AMD-present), No OS and failed hard drive conditions load the BIOS as the fallback. It usually happens under 3 conditions:
* Drive failure (most common)
* No OS (boot file corruption, or the system was erased. More effective then “No boot device found” errors. This can indicate a secondhand unit erased by the previous owner too)
* No drive installed/detected (Used laptop where the drive was pulled, or failed and the previous owner sold it with the bad drive installed)
-The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality. When these laptops were new, many of them had an issue with the original HD within 1.5-2 years consistently. At this point, many of these Toshiba laptops with these junky factory original Toshiba HDs are dying in droves with the same POST errors - mainly “no POST”, “No boot device”, or going to BIOS as they age, or it died for the original owner and was purchased used that way by someone who wants to repair it.
+The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality. When these laptops were new, many of them had an issue with the original HD within 1.5-2 years consistently. At this point, many of these Toshiba laptops with these junky factory original Toshiba HDs are dying in droves with the same POST errors - mainly “no POST”, “No boot device”, or going to BIOS as they age, or it died for the original owner and was purchased used that way by someone who wants to repair it. ***''Yes, I could easily score a unit with top end specs and fix it with an NVMe SSD and a 256GB boot SSD, but I do not buy Toshiba/Dynabook new OR used out of principle.''***
***A lot of newer laptops - not just Toshiba have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s increasingly becoming expected behavior.*** If you have a AMI skin Toshiba, these still use the traditional POST messaging. Dell also does it on the newer SupportAssist UEFI machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed, or if you use Dell Data Wipe). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

-Listen to the hard drive - with the visual Toshiba BIOS (HSW/AMD-present), the hard drive/OS issue fallback is to load the BIOS. It usually happens under 3 conditions:
+Listen to the hard drive - with the visual Toshiba BIOS (HSW/AMD-present), No OS and failed hard drive conditions load the BIOS as the fallback. It usually happens under 3 conditions:
* Drive failure (most common)
* No OS (boot file corruption, or the system was erased. More effective then “No boot device found” errors. This can indicate a secondhand unit erased by the previous owner too)
* No drive installed/detected (Used laptop where the drive was pulled, or failed and the previous owner sold it with the bad drive installed)
The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality. When these laptops were new, many of them had an issue with the original HD within 1.5-2 years consistently. At this point, many of these Toshiba laptops with these junky factory original Toshiba HDs are dying in droves with the same POST errors - mainly “no POST”, “No boot device”, or going to BIOS as they age, or it died for the original owner and was purchased used that way by someone who wants to repair it.
***A lot of newer laptops - not just Toshiba have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s increasingly becoming expected behavior.*** If you have a AMI skin Toshiba, these still use the traditional POST messaging. Dell also does it on the newer SupportAssist UEFI machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed, or if you use Dell Data Wipe). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

Listen to the hard drive - with the visual Toshiba BIOS (HSW/AMD-present), the hard drive/OS issue fallback is to load the BIOS. It usually happens under 3 conditions:
* Drive failure (most common)
* No OS (boot file corruption, or the system was erased. More effective then “No boot device found” errors. This can indicate a secondhand unit erased by the previous owner too)
* No drive installed/detected (Used laptop where the drive was pulled, or failed and the previous owner sold it with the bad drive installed)
-The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality. When these laptops were new, many of them had an issue with the original HD within 1.5-2 years consistently. At this point, many of these Toshiba laptops with these junky Toshiba HDs are dead so a lot of them are showing “no POST”, “No boot device”, or going to BIOS as they age, or it died for the original owner and was purchased that way.
+The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality. When these laptops were new, many of them had an issue with the original HD within 1.5-2 years consistently. At this point, many of these Toshiba laptops with these junky factory original Toshiba HDs are dying in droves with the same POST errors - mainly “no POST”, “No boot device”, or going to BIOS as they age, or it died for the original owner and was purchased used that way by someone who wants to repair it.
***A lot of newer laptops - not just Toshiba have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s increasingly becoming expected behavior.*** If you have a AMI skin Toshiba, these still use the traditional POST messaging. Dell also does it on the newer SupportAssist UEFI machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed, or if you use Dell Data Wipe). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

Listen to the hard drive - with the visual Toshiba BIOS (HSW/AMD-present), the hard drive/OS issue fallback is to load the BIOS. It usually happens under 3 conditions:
* Drive failure (most common)
* No OS (boot file corruption, or the system was erased. More effective then “No boot device found” errors. This can indicate a secondhand unit erased by the previous owner too)
* No drive installed/detected (Used laptop where the drive was pulled, or failed and the previous owner sold it with the bad drive installed)
-The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality.
+The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality. When these laptops were new, many of them had an issue with the original HD within 1.5-2 years consistently. At this point, many of these Toshiba laptops with these junky Toshiba HDs are dead so a lot of them are showing “no POST”, “No boot device”, or going to BIOS as they age, or it died for the original owner and was purchased that way.
***A lot of newer laptops - not just Toshiba have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s increasingly becoming expected behavior.*** If you have a AMI skin Toshiba, these still use the traditional POST messaging. Dell also does it on the newer SupportAssist UEFI machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed, or if you use Dell Data Wipe). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

Listen to the hard drive - with the visual Toshiba BIOS (HSW/AMD-present), the hard drive/OS issue fallback is to load the BIOS. It usually happens under 3 conditions:
* Drive failure (most common)
* No OS (boot file corruption, or the system was erased. More effective then “No boot device found” errors. This can indicate a secondhand unit erased by the previous owner too)
* No drive installed/detected (Used laptop where the drive was pulled, or failed and the previous owner sold it with the bad drive installed)
The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality.
-***A lot of newer laptops - not just Toshiba have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s increasingly becoming expected behavior.*** If you have a AMI skin Toshiba, these still use the traditional POST messaging. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed, or if you use Dell Data Wipe). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.
+***A lot of newer laptops - not just Toshiba have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s increasingly becoming expected behavior.*** If you have a AMI skin Toshiba, these still use the traditional POST messaging. Dell also does it on the newer SupportAssist UEFI machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed, or if you use Dell Data Wipe). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

Listen to the hard drive - with the visual Toshiba BIOS (HSW/AMD-present), the hard drive/OS issue fallback is to load the BIOS. It usually happens under 3 conditions:
* Drive failure (most common)
* No OS (boot file corruption, or the system was erased. More effective then “No boot device found” errors. This can indicate a secondhand unit erased by the previous owner too)
* No drive installed/detected (Used laptop where the drive was pulled, or failed and the previous owner sold it with the bad drive installed)
The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality.
-***A lot of newer laptops - not just Toshiba have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s increasingly becoming expected behavior.*** If you have a AMI skin Toshiba, these still use the traditional POST messaging. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.
+***A lot of newer laptops - not just Toshiba have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s increasingly becoming expected behavior.*** If you have a AMI skin Toshiba, these still use the traditional POST messaging. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed, or if you use Dell Data Wipe). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

Listen to the hard drive - with the visual Toshiba BIOS (HSW/AMD-present), the hard drive/OS issue fallback is to load the BIOS. It usually happens under 3 conditions:
* Drive failure (most common)
* No OS (boot file corruption, or the system was erased. More effective then “No boot device found” errors. This can indicate a secondhand unit erased by the previous owner too)
-* No drive installed (Used laptop where the drive was pulled, or failed and the previous owner sold it with the bad drive installed)
+* No drive installed/detected (Used laptop where the drive was pulled, or failed and the previous owner sold it with the bad drive installed)
The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality.
***A lot of newer laptops - not just Toshiba have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s increasingly becoming expected behavior.*** If you have a AMI skin Toshiba, these still use the traditional POST messaging. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

-Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops that have the visual BIOS (HSW-present), they usually boot to the BIOS as a fallback when there’s an issue, under 3 conditions:
+Listen to the hard drive - with the visual Toshiba BIOS (HSW/AMD-present), the hard drive/OS issue fallback is to load the BIOS. It usually happens under 3 conditions:
* Drive failure (most common)
-* No drive installed (you got the laptop used with a physically pulled drive, or or was sold due to the bad hard drive)
-* No OS (more effective fallback then “no operating system”/”No bootable drive” messages. Again, this usually indicates a secondhand unit unless you erased it yourself)
-The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the hard drives are any indication of quality.
+* No OS (boot file corruption, or the system was erased. More effective then “No boot device found” errors. This can indicate a secondhand unit erased by the previous owner too)
+* No drive installed (Used laptop where the drive was pulled, or failed and the previous owner sold it with the bad drive installed)
+The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the spinning hard drives are any indication of quality.
-A lot of the newer laptops have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s usually expected behavior. Toshiba did it after going to the “modern” UEFI BIOS that isn’t reference AMI until they left the laptop market entirely. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.
+***A lot of newer laptops - not just Toshiba have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s increasingly becoming expected behavior.*** If you have a AMI skin Toshiba, these still use the traditional POST messaging. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

-Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops that have the visual BIOS (HSW-present), they usually boot to the BIOS as a fallback when there’s an issue, usually under 3 conditions:
+Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops that have the visual BIOS (HSW-present), they usually boot to the BIOS as a fallback when there’s an issue, under 3 conditions:
* Drive failure (most common)
* No drive installed (you got the laptop used with a physically pulled drive, or or was sold due to the bad hard drive)
* No OS (more effective fallback then “no operating system”/”No bootable drive” messages. Again, this usually indicates a secondhand unit unless you erased it yourself)
The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the hard drives are any indication of quality.
A lot of the newer laptops have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s usually expected behavior. Toshiba did it after going to the “modern” UEFI BIOS that isn’t reference AMI until they left the laptop market entirely. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

-Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops that have the visual BIOS (HSW-present), they usually boot to the BIOS when there’s an issue under 3 conditions:
+Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops that have the visual BIOS (HSW-present), they usually boot to the BIOS as a fallback when there’s an issue, usually under 3 conditions:
* Drive failure (most common)
* No drive installed (you got the laptop used with a physically pulled drive, or or was sold due to the bad hard drive)
-* No OS (more effective fallback then “no operating system”/”No bootable drive” messages. Again, usually indicates a secondhand unit unless you erased it yourself)
+* No OS (more effective fallback then “no operating system”/”No bootable drive” messages. Again, this usually indicates a secondhand unit unless you erased it yourself)
The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the hard drives are any indication of quality.
-A lot of the newer laptops have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s usually expected behavior. Toshiba did it after going to the “modern” UEFI BIOS that isn’t reference AMI until they left the laptop market entirely. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong.
+A lot of the newer laptops have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s usually expected behavior. Toshiba did it after going to the “modern” UEFI BIOS that isn’t reference AMI until they left the laptop market entirely. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong. This post shows how well using the BIOS as a fallback works to hint that something needs to be checked.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops that have the visual BIOS (HSW-present), they usually boot to the BIOS when there’s an issue under 3 conditions:
* Drive failure (most common)
* No drive installed (you got the laptop used with a physically pulled drive, or or was sold due to the bad hard drive)
-* No OS (more effective fallback then “no operating system”/”No bootable drive” messages. Again, usually indictive of a secondhand unit unless you erased it yourself)
+* No OS (more effective fallback then “no operating system”/”No bootable drive” messages. Again, usually indicates a secondhand unit unless you erased it yourself)
The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the hard drives are any indication of quality.
A lot of the newer laptops have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s usually expected behavior. Toshiba did it after going to the “modern” UEFI BIOS that isn’t reference AMI until they left the laptop market entirely. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops that have the visual BIOS (HSW-present), they usually boot to the BIOS when there’s an issue under 3 conditions:
-* No drive installed (you probably got the laptop used)
-* No OS (this is a more effective fallback then “no operating system”/”No bootable drive” error)
-* Failed drive (usually why with Toshiba)
+* Drive failure (most common)
+* No drive installed (you got the laptop used with a physically pulled drive, or or was sold due to the bad hard drive)
+* No OS (more effective fallback then “no operating system”/”No bootable drive” messages. Again, usually indictive of a secondhand unit unless you erased it yourself)
The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the hard drives are any indication of quality.
A lot of the newer laptops have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s usually expected behavior. Toshiba did it after going to the “modern” UEFI BIOS that isn’t reference AMI until they left the laptop market entirely. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

-Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops (post Sandy/Ivy) that have the visual BIOS, they usually boot to the BIOS when there’s an issue under 3 conditions:
+Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops that have the visual BIOS (HSW-present), they usually boot to the BIOS when there’s an issue under 3 conditions:
* No drive installed (you probably got the laptop used)
* No OS (this is a more effective fallback then “no operating system”/”No bootable drive” error)
* Failed drive (usually why with Toshiba)
The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the hard drives are any indication of quality.
A lot of the newer laptops have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s usually expected behavior. Toshiba did it after going to the “modern” UEFI BIOS that isn’t reference AMI until they left the laptop market entirely. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops (post Sandy/Ivy) that have the visual BIOS, they usually boot to the BIOS when there’s an issue under 3 conditions:
* No drive installed (you probably got the laptop used)
* No OS (this is a more effective fallback then “no operating system”/”No bootable drive” error)
* Failed drive (usually why with Toshiba)
The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the hard drives are any indication of quality.
-A lot of the newer laptops have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s usually expected behavior. Toshiba did it after going to the “modern” UEFI BIOS that isn’t reference AMI until they left the laptop market entirely. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure, so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong.
+A lot of the newer laptops have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s usually expected behavior. Toshiba did it after going to the “modern” UEFI BIOS that isn’t reference AMI until they left the laptop market entirely. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure (or if it’s a corporate computer, let IT know it has a hard drive problem), so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

-Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops (post Sandy/Ivy) that have the visual BIOS, they usually boot to the BIOS when there’s an issue with the hard drive where it’s not recognized, or isn’t responding. Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. Never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot pole if the hard drives are any indication of quality - and I’d ask someone with the Delta variant to cough on it so it can’t be touched without catching Covid.
+Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops (post Sandy/Ivy) that have the visual BIOS, they usually boot to the BIOS when there’s an issue under 3 conditions:
+
+* No drive installed (you probably got the laptop used)
+* No OS (this is a more effective fallback then “no operating system”/”No bootable drive” error)
+* Failed drive (usually why with Toshiba)
+The issue is Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. I’ve never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot Coronavirus ridden pole if the hard drives are any indication of quality.
A lot of the newer laptops have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s usually expected behavior. Toshiba did it after going to the “modern” UEFI BIOS that isn’t reference AMI until they left the laptop market entirely. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure, so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

-Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops (post Sandy/Ivy) that have the visual BIOS, they usually boot to the BIOS when there’s an issue with the hard drive where it’s not recognized, or isn’t responding. Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. Never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot pole if the hard drives are any indication of quality.
+Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops (post Sandy/Ivy) that have the visual BIOS, they usually boot to the BIOS when there’s an issue with the hard drive where it’s not recognized, or isn’t responding. Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. Never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot pole if the hard drives are any indication of quality - and I’d ask someone with the Delta variant to cough on it so it can’t be touched without catching Covid.
A lot of the newer laptops have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s usually expected behavior. Toshiba did it after going to the “modern” UEFI BIOS that isn’t reference AMI until they left the laptop market entirely. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure, so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong.

Durum:

open

Düzenleyen: Nick ,

Metin:

Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops (post Sandy/Ivy) that have the visual BIOS, they usually boot to the BIOS when there’s an issue with the hard drive where it’s not recognized, or isn’t responding. Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. Never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot pole if the hard drives are any indication of quality.
-A lot of the newer laptops have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s usually expected behavior. Toshiba did it until they left the laptop market entirely, and Dell does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but shows the no boot device message if there is no installed drive) just to name two I’ve hard of who made the switch from a vague message to a fallback where the user knows if it boots to the BIOS, there may be a HD/SSD issue.
+A lot of the newer laptops have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s usually expected behavior. Toshiba did it after going to the “modern” UEFI BIOS that isn’t reference AMI until they left the laptop market entirely. Dell also does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but in some cases like my 7490, still shows the no boot device message with no drive installed). They did this because normal users do not understand no boot device means the drive needs to be checked for failure, so they moved to providing a visual indicator so the user can see something is wrong.

Durum:

open

Orijinal gönderinin sahibi: Nick ,

Metin:

Listen to the hard drive - with the newer Toshiba laptops (post Sandy/Ivy) that have the visual BIOS, they usually boot to the BIOS when there’s an issue with the hard drive where it’s not recognized, or isn’t responding. Toshiba is known for having horribly unreliable mechanical hard drives. Never tried their SSDs, but I wouldn’t touch them with a 100 foot pole if the hard drives are any indication of quality.

A lot of the newer laptops have moved to the BIOS boot fallback, or run diagnostics automatically so it’s usually expected behavior. Toshiba did it until they left the laptop market entirely, and Dell does it on their newer machines if the drive is bad (but shows the no boot device message if there is no installed drive) just to name two I’ve hard of who made the switch from a vague message to a fallback where the user knows if it boots to the BIOS, there may be a HD/SSD issue.

Durum:

open