Skip to main content

Introduction

Many tire pumps start to lose grip on the tire valves over time because the rubber gaskets slide against the threads on the sides of the valves, and over time this wears away part of the gasket so it no longer holds.

Many bike pumps use the same dual-valve head, and it's not immediately obvious how to repair or replace this rubber part. This rubber part is also probably common among many different pump heads- both floor pumps and frame pumps.

In this guide, I will show how to get a little more life out of the rubber gaskets merely by swapping them around. One can also replace them at this point.

Tools

No tools specified.

  1. It's probably easier to work on the head when it is separate from the pump, so unscrew the cover on the hose at the pump head. You may need to use pliers to get enough grip. It's probably easier to work on the head when it is separate from the pump, so unscrew the cover on the hose at the pump head. You may need to use pliers to get enough grip. It's probably easier to work on the head when it is separate from the pump, so unscrew the cover on the hose at the pump head. You may need to use pliers to get enough grip.
    • It's probably easier to work on the head when it is separate from the pump, so unscrew the cover on the hose at the pump head. You may need to use pliers to get enough grip.

  2. Pull to remove the hose
    • Pull to remove the hose

  3. Remove this pin however you prefer- hammer it out with a drift or other somewhat pointy object, press it out, whatever. Sorry, no pictures, you shouldn't try what I did, even if there was photographic evidence.
    • Remove this pin however you prefer- hammer it out with a drift or other somewhat pointy object, press it out, whatever. Sorry, no pictures, you shouldn't try what I did, even if there was photographic evidence.

    • At first glance, it looked like a rivet or peened over head, so I tried to grind the head off of it. After grinding it down by a couple of millimeters from each end, it became clear that it was a pressed in pin, and not peened or riveted. So, learn from my mistake and do not try to grind it like I did.

  4. After the pin has been removed, the lever easily comes out Next, use another  pokey tool (pen, matchstick, small screwdriver, whatever) to push through either valve hole and push the rest of the internals out These are some of the internals
    • After the pin has been removed, the lever easily comes out

    • Next, use another pokey tool (pen, matchstick, small screwdriver, whatever) to push through either valve hole and push the rest of the internals out

    • These are some of the internals

  5. Using your same pokey tool, push the gaskets out by pushing the tool along the side of each valve hole These are all the parts of the pump head, including the pin that's been missing from previous pictures. Note the rubber ball that was hiding between two other pieces. Do not lose it or the pump will not be able to automatically switch between valves
    • Using your same pokey tool, push the gaskets out by pushing the tool along the side of each valve hole

    • These are all the parts of the pump head, including the pin that's been missing from previous pictures. Note the rubber ball that was hiding between two other pieces. Do not lose it or the pump will not be able to automatically switch between valves

  6. These are the gaskets that have probably worn down. They are identical, but facing opposite directions.  The bottom is for the presta valve, and the smaller hole wears down for it. The top gasket is for the schrader valve, and the larger diameter wears down on that one. Switch the gaskets around while flipping them over, or just replace with  new gaskets.  As mentioned previously, these gaskets may be common among many different types of pump heads. Next push the gaskets into the pump head Put the other pieces in the pump head ("reassembly is the reverse of disassembly"), making sure the rubber ball is captured between the other two pieces.
    • These are the gaskets that have probably worn down. They are identical, but facing opposite directions. The bottom is for the presta valve, and the smaller hole wears down for it. The top gasket is for the schrader valve, and the larger diameter wears down on that one.

    • Switch the gaskets around while flipping them over, or just replace with new gaskets. As mentioned previously, these gaskets may be common among many different types of pump heads. Next push the gaskets into the pump head

    • Put the other pieces in the pump head ("reassembly is the reverse of disassembly"), making sure the rubber ball is captured between the other two pieces.

  7. Press the pin back into the pump head and through the lever. I have done this with a vise, but if you do not care about smashed fingers, you can try to hammer it in
    • Press the pin back into the pump head and through the lever. I have done this with a vise, but if you do not care about smashed fingers, you can try to hammer it in

    • Push the pump head back onto the hose and screw down the cover. Done!

Finish Line

2 other people completed this guide.

Mark H

Member since: 20-08-2012

671 Reputation

4 Guides authored

One Comment

Thank you. Shall definitely try it (using a vice)! Cheers!

Ashok Captain - Yanıt

Add Comment

View Statistics:

Past 24 Hours: 4

Past 7 Days: 16

Past 30 Days: 123

All Time: 3,795